Conducting a check-out inventory of fixtures

As its name suggests, check-out inventory of fixtures occurs at the end of your stay in the apartment. It’s best to anticipate this moment: you can’t leave without conducting a check-out inventory. This step should be carried out carefully so you can leave in the best conditions possible. Here’s all you need to know. 
 

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Check-out inventory


Check-out inventory of fixtures: how to leave the place properly?

 

The purpose of conducting a check-out inventory of fixtures

 

As you must have gathered with the check-in inventory, the check-out inventory’s purpose is to assess the condition the dwelling at the end of the rental period, and to see what impact the tenant had on the premises. If these are non-existent or minimal compared to the situation at the beginning of the rental period, there will be nothing to pay for. On the other hand, if damage is detected during the check-out inventory of fixtures while they were absent during the check-in inventory of fixtures, the tenant will have to pay for necessary repairs. If the check-in inventory document (we hope you kept it!)  isn’t identical to the check-out one, you will discuss what’s yours to repair or not with your lessor. And whether your security deposit will be fully returned or not is decided on the basis of the check-out inventory. 
 

Planifying a check-out inventory of fixtures 

 

Start by checking yourself if you have made any damage to the property or equipment. If you have, plan a delay to carry out repairs instead of waiting for the check-out inventory of fixtures to make the repairs. Once you have decided on a date that would be convenient for you, contact your landlord to let him know. If the date doesn’t suit him, agree with him on a date that works for everyone.  Whenever possible, have the check-out inventory take place on the same day you give back the keys. That way, you will already have emptied the place of your stuff and the apartment will seem cleaner.



How to conduct a check-out inventory of fixtures?  


Before the inventory
 

For the exit inventory to be carried out in the best possible way, it must first be well prepared. Here are some ideas:
 

  • doing a “pre-inventory” yourself, checking your home for possible anomalies. If you find any, it’s best to take charge of repairs before the inventory to avoid conflicts with your landlord. 
  • preparing the check-in inventory document as you will need it for comparison.  
  • Have a major cleanup done before the inventory. If there’s a balcony, clean it too. It will please the landlord to see his place clean as a whistle. 
  • Empty your belongings. 
     

Doing this can save you precious time during the inventory of fixtures on your way out, and tip the scales in your favour in the event of a contentious situation.


 

During the inventory
 

Once you’ve set a date with your lessor and prepared the check-in following the steps described earlier, the next step is to conduct the inventory of fixtures. You can delegate the visit to a member of your family if you can’t be there in person for the check-out inventory of fixtures.  


In a same manner as the check-in inventory of fixtures, visit the place room by room and take notes of the conditions of walls, floor, ceiling, windows, doors, furniture, and all household appliances and electrical installations. Rely on the points listed on the check-in inventory document and compare all of them. If everything’s identical, it’s a win! You should get your security deposit back. Otherwise, it’s a little less simple: we’ll mention it right afterwards. 


Here are a few tips to keep in mind during the inventory of fixtures:  

 

  • Be transparent! If you know you’ve damaged something, it’s no use trying to hide it from the landlord. If he doesn’t notice during the inventory, he will probably come back to you after you left and you’ll have to manage the issue remotely, which will prove to be far more complicated. Besides, if you show good faith, he’ll probably be easier on you. 
  • Don’t get intimidated by the landlord: you should discuss things together to reach an agreement regarding what’s written on the check-out inventory. Try both describing things in a neutral manner, rather than simply writing “good” or “bad” condition.  The condition of an item can vary from one point of view to another: a fussy landlord may describe it as average when you think it's good. Don't be afraid to talk it out with him, by remaining friendly of course. 
  • Don’t be afraid to mention the security deposit. Your landlord needs time after the inventory to estimate how much the potential repairs you owe him amount to, but you can still remind him it should be returned to you within two months, and also discuss whether he plans to give it back to you in full or not


 

After the check-out inventory
 

Two issues can occur after the check-out inventory. 
 

If the comparison between check-in and check-out inventories show no differences, you can return the keys and move out for good. You are also entitled to recover the security deposit you paid your landlord at the beginning of the rent. 
 

If the check-out inventory of fixtures  has revealed damage to the property, you will be held responsible for it. You must take charge of necessary repairs to restore the accommodation. The amount of these repairs is then deducted from the security deposit, and the landlord will return the remaining part of the deposit to you. If the amount of the repairs exceeds the amount of the security deposit, you will have to pay the excess to the landlord.
 

Info: once the inventory is done, don’t forget to give all of the set of keys back! Also remember to terminate your water and electricity plans if they’re at your expense.

 


Disputes related to check-out inventory of fixtures


What you can’t be blamed for
 

Some deterioration is caused by natural wear of the premises. Don’t worry about the paint peeling, it can be caused by humidity and it’s not your fault. You shouldn’t accept that mentions like “carpeting to be changed” or “walls to be repainted” are noted on your check-out inventory. These are heavy repairs that are the landlord’s responsibility - except if you’ve wrecked the place, which won’t happen! 
 

Litigation proceedings

 

It’s slow and tedious to go back once the inventory is signed. It’s really best to reach a common understanding at the time of check-out inventory, and not hastily signing a check-out inventory you don’t actually agree on. Before you embark on an energy-intensive and time-consuming legal process, try to find amicable solutions with your lessor. If you have made efforts to maintain a relationship of trust with your him, you should be able to find common ground.
 

If your landlord blames you for damage and you think it’s unfair, your disagreement can be brought before a departmental conciliation committee. Under this scenario, you’d start by sending them a registered letter describing the issue. If it doesn’t amount to anything, you’ll have to bring the case to the court. These are time-consuming procedures who might handicap you if you have to return to your home country after your stay in France. It’s best to make every effort to reach an agreement with the landlord at the moment of the check-out inventory. That is entirely doable if you’ve maintained good relations with him until that moment! 

 

Info: don’t forget that the landlord can keep 20% of your security deposit to regularize service charges in case the annual regularization of service charges done by the co-owners doesn’t match with your departure.

 

 

Disputes related to check-out inventory of fixtures

 

What you can’t be blamed for
 

Some deterioration is caused by natural wear of the premises. Don’t worry about the paint peeling, it can be caused by humidity and it’s not your fault. You shouldn’t accept that mentions like “carpeting to be changed” or “walls to be repainted” are noted on your check-out inventory. These are heavy repairs that are the landlord’s responsibility - except if you’ve wrecked the place, which won’t happen! 
 

Litigation proceedings

 

It’s slow and tedious to go back once the inventory is signed. It’s really best to reach a common understanding at the time of check-out inventory, and not hastily signing a check-out inventory you don’t actually agree on. Before you embark on an energy-intensive and time-consuming legal process, try to find amicable solutions with your lessor. If you have made efforts to maintain a relationship of trust with your him, you should be able to find common ground. 
 

If your landlord blames you for damage and you think it’s unfair, your disagreement can be brought before a departmental conciliation committee. Under this scenario, you’d start by sending them a registered letter describing the issue. If it doesn’t amount to anything, you’ll have to bring the case to the court. These are time-consuming procedures who might handicap you if you have to return to your home country after your stay in France. It’s best to make every effort to reach an agreement with the landlord at the moment of the check-out inventory. That is entirely doable if you’ve maintained good relations with him until that moment! 
 

Info: don’t forget that the landlord can keep 20% of your security deposit to regularize service charges in case the annual regularization of service charges done by the co-owners doesn’t match with your departure

 

How can Studapart help you with your check-out inventory of fixtures?  

 

Read more on our resource centre

 

In addition to this page dedicated to explaining check-out inventory of fixtures, Studapart provides you with a thorough resource centre. It is a mine of information for tenants who might get lost in their procedures, or are not at ease with the lingo. Our glossary can prove to be very useful. Some pages deal entirely with steps prior to the inventory of fixtures that must be carried out properly. For example, you can find useful information about the security deposit, drafting your lease agreement, being in good terms with your landlord, etc. 
 

 

Studapart helps you build trust with your landlord

 

Studapart acts as a third party between you and your renter. Our team of experts speaks several languages and is available 6 days a week to answer your questions. Our community of 36,000 owners trusts our platform and disputes seldom happen. But in the event of a dispute relating to the check-out inventory of fixtures, Studapart is also there to find a quick solution between the landlord and the tenant to avoid a judicial escalation. No hassle, either side! 
 


 

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